New Series: Introducing MOOCs

20 Apr

I’ve decided that I will start a new series of blog posts. Inspired by a conversation with a friend in which I learned that many people aren’t aware of the new developments occurring in online education, over the next several weeks I plan to write multiple summaries and reviews of various online education platforms, commonly called MOOCs. MOOC stands for Massively Online Open Course. Take a look at either of these Youtube videos or this description in the New York Times if you want a quick and easy idea of what a MOOC is. In this series I plan to cover all the big names in the industry, as well as some smaller ones. This will allow my friends who are studying international development to explore to fields, as well people outside of academia (like me) to indulge their curiosities. Although there are many benefits to MOOCs that a normal in-person course cannot offer, for now I will focus on the big three that make up the MOO of the MOOC.

  • Massive – There is a physical limit to how many bodies can fit into any lecture hall, but the bandwidth which limits participants in a MOOC is much higher. The highest enrollment so far has been Think Again: How to Reason and Argue, a course from Duke University offered on Coursera, which had an enrollment of 180000 students. These numbers are impressive, but it is also clear that if a professor’s priority is to teach students, she can teach far more students with a single MOOC than with an entire career of teaching in a brick and mortar university. When Sebastian Thrun of Stanford first offered his Introduction to Artificial Intelligence he was amazed to see an enrollment of 160,000 students. Thrun eventually left his tenured position at Stanford to start his own MOOC, Udacity. There is also a benefit for the student, though: through the forums in a course the students and discuss, connect, and network with far more people than a traditional brick and mortar course would ever allow.
  • Online – This seems simple, but this is a huge development. Traditionally, if a person lived in an area with no school or university nearby, there is no option for that person to learn from a professor. But with a MOOC a person can live in a geographically isolated area and still learn from courses created by respected universities and taught by experienced and passionate professors. This is a big equalizing effect, seeing as people who live in Chicago, Boston, or Paris, or Tokyo have relatively easy access to high education, but people living in rural Afghanistan (like some of Thrun’s students) or other physically isolated areas normally have few options for advanced education. A MOOC changes this, allowing  these students to learn independent of their geography.
  • Open – These courses are open in at least two senses. First, you don’t have to be affiliated with any particular organization in order to take the course. You can take a course from Duke University, UC Berkley, or Yale, and you don’t have to be officially enrolled as a student, nor to have any connection whatsoever to that University. Second, they are free. That’s right: MOOCs (normally) are %100 free. There are some courses where you can pay to have your work officially certified and recognized by some educational authority, but the course itself doesn’t cost anything.

Over the course of the next few weeks I’ll write summaries of the different organizations and business that offer these MOOCs online (I’ll refer to the organizations and the companies as MOOCs as well), and hopefully by following along on this series of blog posts you’ll be able to get a good idea of what the MOOC landscape looks like. In the meantime, take a look at one of the founders of Udacity describing his own experience in a TEDTalk:

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2 Responses to “New Series: Introducing MOOCs”

  1. Nantisara May 2, 2013 at 1:22 pm #

    Hi. Thank you for posting this. I am curious about one thing when you mentioned about the potentiality to learn in a geographically isolated area. In reality, those people like in Afghanistan as you also mentioned have less access to the internet. Even in the capital city, Kabul, people pay so much money to get internet access and still get slow internet. So, I don’t think there’re many people living in the area can get access to the MOOCs.
    I’m interested in getting to know more about Thrun’s Afghan students or ones who have limited internet access. Do you have more information on this?

    • joseph.lemien@gmail.com May 3, 2013 at 10:10 am #

      I plan to write a post about some of the problems with MOOCs, and I will touch on the issue of people without access.

      As far a Thrun’s Afghan students go, I don’t have any more detailed information. I’d recommend just emailing him to ask.

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