Introducing MOOCs: Alison

10 Aug
Alison is a bit different from many of the other MOOCs. Alison aims to be more practical, and to give people the skills that they need for doing a better job at work or for starting a new career. Such a focus on technical skills rather than on liberal arts education means that there aren’t classes on greek philosophy, literature, or microeconomics. Rather, the courses on Alison focus on how to effectively use Microsoft suite (word, power point, excel), business management, legal studies, and project management. I have to admit that I likes this idea from the start. It is great to be able to get a good liberal arts education from Coursera, or to learn how to program from Udacity, but unless you want to be a college professor or a computer programmer, those courses are just for hobbyists. I think it is wonderful that Alison is providing courses for people who need job skills. The courses are also self-paced, like Udacity, so you don’t need to wait to start learning. You can just dive right in, which is great. That where the greatness ends, though. There are a few aspects of Alison which makes it a far lesser platform than either Coursera or Udacity.

Design

Bad formatting on Alison's site
Simply put, Alison is not as pretty or visually attractive as Udacity or Coursera. The website looks cluttered, having too many links leading to too many places on the main page. They need to collapse some of these lists and allow them to be opened in secondary menus. As an example, take a look at the image to the right. I took this image from a page on Alison’s website where links were overlapping with a photo, making the text hard to read. This is a simple thing to fix, and the fact that it hasn’t been fixed shows a very low level of care, attention, ability, or design skill.

Quality of courses

I took a course on customer service from Alison. It turned out to be about 15 pages of reading, and it was pretty basic stuff, too. I was somewhat disappointed.  I’m not sure what quality control there is on Alison, but it definitely doesn’t compare to Udacity and Coursera. Some of the classes are also very basic, such as how to use MS Word. Not all of the classes are that simple, as they also host classes such as Fundraising for Non-Profits and Accounting. These classes could be quite useful, and I could envision many people benefiting from taking some of these classes. In my experience so far, many of the classes are very elementary.
I know very little about Microsoft Office’s programs (such as power point and excel), so I started a class on Alison to learn more about how to use Powerpoint. It moved slowly and was very boring. It taught me many ways to use Powerpoint that I think weren’t especially useful. If I had been able to skip around more or speed up the class it wouldn’t have been so bad, but…

Videos from Vimeo

You can’t change the speed on Alison’s videos. This is a problem. One major feature on Coursera is the ability to speed up videos. It is built into the system, and it is a commonly used strategy to allow learners to watch one hour of video lectures in 50 minutes. Although this feature isn’t built directly into Udacity, the function is available on their YouTube hosted-videos. But Alison’s video lectures are hosted on Vimeo, which offers less flexibility to the viewer. On YouTube you can choose the quality and the speed of the video depending on your preferences and available bandwidth. But Vimeo doesn’t offer this option. I consider this to be a big drawback.
All in all, I like the idea of Alison, and the have a major strong point in offering courses on subjects that the bigger MOOCs aren’t touching. However, there are some significant downsides, too. I think that Alison is still worth it, but if I was in charge I would definitely make some major changes to the site.
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